R E C O G N I T I O N

There’s more than one way to get your freak on…


It happens to a lot of people; The ReCognition.

Every face will cause another to recognize you as the one that’s been on their mind.

“Oh, hey, aren’t you so and so?” they ask.

I stop what I’m doing and look into their eyes.

“No, we just shared a universal face moment,” I respond in laughter.

Most people return the laughter while others attempt to do the placement thing, like; did you attend the…?; do you go to….?; do your kids go to…?”

Sometimes I agree with whatever activity, location, or event they seem to remember me. I don’t get out much socially and am pretty confident about the doppelganger theory.


Over the years, I’ve gotten more daring in anticipation of it. Yesterday, the cashier at the market was quite intense as she explained to me the state of long lines and related customer waiting time.

She glanced over at my kids and asked if they were related, and when they nodded in the affirmative, she said, “Yeah, you all look alike,” before turning back to me and smiling.

She was, in my opinion, very friendly but moving considerably slow, given her concerns about the line.

She continued talking, “They have beautiful eyes. You know, I just started here four days ago. They transferred me from another store. It’s a shame — these lines. I feel sorry for everyone,” she stopped to look up at me after scanning the last item.

“Hey, are you the woman that just came back from out of the country?” she asked.

For some reason, I found her entire line of communications oddly constructed. Instead of replying, I just looked at her, a little dumbfounded. But also searching for some response to snap her out of the depression-like coma she was physically displaying via her slow movements.

“I’m not sure, I returned to Earth a few years ago, but outside of that, the farthest I’ve been is Mexico, and I haven’t been back there since the flood in 1888,” I replied with a deadpan face.

The folks behind me were staring at me like I was crazy as the cashier laughed and said, “Hmm, you look like the woman that just came back. You’ve got lots of helpers there, do you need any help out?”

I smiled, “I do, we’re good, thanks for remembering me and my rugrats!” I said, before picking up the one bag of groceries.

It takes just a small effort to remind others that even though we are not who they think we are, we are all cognitively connected.

Every interaction doesn’t need to mean anything, but if we want it too, it can. It doesn’t take much to freak out a neighbor, or a neighborhood.

If we can do it with a smile, in fun and in presence with moments of ReLation, why not make it so?