The first time I played tug-of-war and those opposing me released the rope; I found myself wounded and unprepared for the fall. We don’t expect this in real life, that the surrender of our enemies will cause pain. We play with the expectation to win but too often we forget the game, and when this happens, there is no win because in our fall we realize the war was only ours alone.

We find ourselves at the mercy of a draw, then filled with anxiety about our artistry.

When the dead know they are dying, very few use their energy to teach. Most find themselves in a museum of their own making and sitting alone in a guarded room to ponder the various interpretations of the life they painted. Most will be expressionless because it is the relationship with themselves they most want to reconcile, and soon after that, their maker.

I’ve asked Him plenty of times whether I’ve lived up to the roles he’s so far assigned me to, but I don’t wait for his answer. I already know I didn’t play to the scripts passed down at birth, nor did I modify my character to reflect the strength I would be called to display in my most aggressive scenes. I don’t look like I sound, nor do I talk like I think, but this is by design, this is what makes each stage interesting, to ourselves and to those we love.

We are all, to some degree, unexpected characters with unexpected characteristics overcoming unexpected odds. This success is the blueprint of Hollywood’s survival, but more importantly, it’s the blueprint of Love’s Victory.

Happiness Is Kissing Love Before Your Time Runs Out